Friday, August 10, 2007

Mosaics....


A few weekends ago we went to the American Visionary Art Museum in Baltimore, and it was amazing! I fell in love with Loring Cornish's mosaics. As per the museum's no photo policy, I have no pictures to show you, so I guess that means that the next time you're in or near Charm City (that's Baltimore in case you haven't heard) you'll have to check out the American Visionary Art Museum for yourself.

Aside from Mr. Imagination's work with recycled bottle caps, Loring Cornish's mosaic work really amazed and inspired me. In the museum there is a large mixed media installation piece/mosaic (it's own room in the museum) by Cornish. The floor in this room is actually artwork that you can stand on--it's a large colorful mirror and glass mosaic. The rest of the installation includes chairs and other furniture (a bed, a trunk, etc.) that Cornish has covered in recycled objects, anything from spoons to shoes, to coins. One of my favorite furnishings in this area was a vintage plastic chair completely covered in nickels. Yes, 5 cent pieces! I would love to know the thought process behind, "do you know what this chair needs? To be covered in nickels!" Talk about putting all your money into your art....

It was the fantastic, "outsider art" works at this museum that inspired me to run right home and cover everything I own with mosaics and mirrors and sequins. Then I realized how much of that sort of thing I have already done, as you can see from the pictures scattered around this post. And, I have more stained glass mosaics (that are really pretty scenes, like flowers, animals, etc) in storage somewhere--in college I worked at an art studio, so I would take the classes they offered and then go crazy with all the tools and supplies they had available. It's funny how you may never call yourself an artist (which is something I had been hesitant to do for quite sometime) and then see works or ideas similar to your own in galleries or museums...what do you do then?

Maybe most of us are all "outsider artists." I believe that creating objects that have meaning or convey ideas (or ideals) is an undertaking we should all feel qualified to partake in. I think that enjoying works of art should be something we can all experience. For a long time (and even still today) art was created for and by the wealthy and educated; well, this is just plain silly. Everyone should be able to create and enjoy art. And, the fabulous American Visionary Art Museum here in Baltimore really reinforced what I already felt.